Sleep

Hand self-shiatsu for sleep problems in persons with chronic pain: a pilot study.

 

METHODS:

A case series design, with participants acting as their own controls, was selected to facilitate hypothesis generation for this novel, under-researched intervention. Sleep efficiency, latency and maintenance, sleep beliefs, pain intensity and basic participant demographics were collected at baseline with actigraphy and standardized self-report questionnaires. After one week of baseline data collection, the HSS intervention was taught to participants. Follow-up data were collected at 2 and 8 weeks post-intervention.

RESULTS:

Data collected at baseline and the two follow-up periods revealed no apparent changes in the objective actigraphy data. However a trend toward improved self-reported sleep latency (time to fall asleep) and sleep duration (time spent asleep) emerged. A number of participants reported they were more concerned with increasing their period of unbroken sleep as opposed to their total sleep time and it is possible that HSS may be useful to be applied during nighttime awakenings as well as before bed. None of the participants reported adverse effects of the intervention.

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Hand self-shiatsu for sleep problems in persons with chronic pain: a pilot study.

Cary A. Brown, Geoff Bostick, Leisa Bellmore, Dilesha Kumanayaka

Journal Of Integrative Medicine [J Integr Med] 2014 Mar; Vol. 12 (2), pp. 94-101

Advancing shiatsu therapy

 

through research